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A GEORGE III HEPPLEWHITE SATINWOOD PEMBROKE TABLE 

Origin: England
Circa Date: 1785
Stock No: F2H0040
Location: New York
Dimensions:
H: 26.8 in (68.0 cm)
W: 38.6 in (98.0 cm)
L/D: 27.6 in (70.0 cm)
Price Range:
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A very fine late eighteenth century satinwood and marquetry Pembroke table of superb colour, the shaped top richly veneered in rosewood, sycamore and other contrasting exotic woods with classical motifs within a crossbanding of inlaid pearl motifs, finished with ebony and boxwood stringing, the central panel depicting a classical urn in marquetry, against a rosewood background within a border of bell flowers. The frieze having a single drawer flanked by simulated fluting in boxwood, the square tapering legs further decorated with water leaf marquetry, terminating in the original brass castors.

Illustrated:
Musgrave, Clifford, 'Adam and Hepplewhite and other Neo-Classical Furniture', Faber and Faber, London, 1966, figure 130 and 131.

Provenance:
Mallett and Son (Antiques), 1960


The term 'Pembroke' table originated from the Earl of Pembroke who reputedly ordered the first of its type. This occasional table with drop sides is typically executed in highly figured satinwood and enriched with inlay. The Hepplewhite period in late eighteenth century England was dominated by the neo-classical furniture designs of the cabinetmaker George Hepplewhite. His work is characterized by a classic simplicity and delicacy as well as light, curved forms, painted or inlaid decoration, and distinctive details such as slender tapering legs terminating with the spade foot.

The three oval panels of neoclassical marquetry, the use of inlaid dentil molding framing the central drawer and the collars on the legs above elaborate marquetry inlay to each ankle, suggest similarities to the work to Christoph Furlohg. Furlohg was a Swedish cabinetmaker who was trained in Europe by the French ebeniste Jean-Francois Oeben. He became an employee of John Linnell at Berkeley Square and was much in demand for his marquetry work of ‘curiously inlaid mahogany and satinwood articles’. He combined his French techniques with the new neoclassical taste in England, which attracted many distinguished patrons including the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Portland.

CONDITION REPORT ON REQUEST.

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